More book news, January 12, 2013

By Mary Louise Ruehr Published:

BOOK CLUBS

• Pierce Streetsboro Library Book Club: 2 p.m. Jan. 14, Streetsboro library meeting room, 8990 Kirby Lane (next to the Streetsboro City Schools Administration Building) -- "Home Front" by Kristin Hannah. Light refreshments will be served, courtesy of the Friends of Pierce Streetsboro Library. Stop by the library for a copy. To register or for more information: 330-626-4458.

• Between the Lines Book Club: 7 p.m. Jan. 14, Hudson Library, 96 Library St. -- "Little Bee" by Chris Cleave. A haunting novel about the tenuous friendship that blooms between two disparate strangers--one an illegal Nigerian refugee, the other a recent widow from suburban London. New members are always welcome. For information: 330-653-6658.

• Your High School Reading List Book Club: 7 to 8:30 p.m. Jan. 15, Kent Free Library, 312 W. Main St. -- "Riders of the Purple Sage" by Zane Grey. Copies available at the Check Out Desk. No registration necessary. For more information: 330-673-4414.

• Randolph Library Cookbook Club: 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Feb. 5, Randolph Town Hall, located next door to the library at 1639 S.R. 44 in Randolph. This month's featured chef is Ree Drummond, also known as the Pioneer Woman on her blog and television show. Participants are asked to bring a dish and a copy of the recipe to the meeting. Cookbooks or recipe printouts are available at the Randolph Library. Cookbook Club members will taste and discuss the recipes and vote on next month's chef. In addition, members may bring old cookbooks they no longer want for a voluntary cookbook exchange. For more information or to register: 330-325-7003.

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'Fifty Shades' trilogy to be released in hardcover

NEW YORK (AP) -- "Fifty Shades of Grey" will soon be slipped under a new set of covers.

E L James' erotic trilogy is being issued in hardcover, the Knopf Doubleday Group announced Thursday. The novels were released last spring as paperbacks and e-books and have since sold more than 65 million copies worldwide. The new editions of "Fifty Shades of Grey," ''Fifty Shades Darker" and "Fifty Shades Freed" each will have a list price of $26.95 and will be available Jan. 29.

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PUBLISHERS WEEKLY BEST-SELLERS

The Associated Press

HARDCOVER FICTION

1. "Gone Girl" by Gillian Flynn (Crown)

2. "Empire and Honor" by W.E.B. Griffin and William Butterworth IV (Putnam Adult)

3. "The Racketeer" by John Grisham (Doubleday)

4. "Threat Vector" by Tom Clancy (Putnam)

5. "Cross Roads" by Wm. Paul Young (Faith/Words)

6. "The Forgotten" by David Baldacci (Grand Central Publishing)

7. "Shadow Woman: A Novel" by Linda Howard (Ballantine)

8. "Notorious Nineteen: A Stephanie Plum Novel" by Janet Evanovich (Bantam)

9. "The Twelve Tribes of Hattie" by Ayana Mathis (Knopf)

10. "The Casual Vacancy" by J.K. Rowling (Little, Brown)

11. "Merry Christmas, Alex Cross" by James Patterson (Little, Brown)

12. "The Black Box" by Michael Connelly (Little, Brown)

13. "The Last Man: A Novel" by Vince Flynn (Atria/Emily Bestler Books)

14. "The Hobbit, or There and Back Again" by J.R.R. Tolkien (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt)

15. "Two Graves" by Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child (Grand Central Publishing)

HARDCOVER NONFICTION

1. "Shred: The Revolutionary Diet" by Ian K. Smith (St. Martin's Press)

2. "Killing Kennedy" by Bill O'Reilly (Henry Holt and Co.)

3. "Barefoot Contessa Foolproof: Recipes You Can Trust" by Ina Garten (Clarkson Potter)

4. "I Declare: 31 Promises to Speak" by Joel Osteen (Faith/Words)

5. "Thomas Jefferson: The Art of Power" by Jon Meacham (Random House)

6. "The World Until Yesterday: What Can We Learn from Traditional Societies" by Jared Diamond (Viking)

7. "No Easy Day" by Mark Owen (Dutton)

8. "To Sell Is Human: The Surprising Truth about Moving Others" by Daniel H. Pink (Riverhead)

9. "The 8-Hour Diet: Watch the Pounds Disappear Without Watching What You Eat" by David Zinczenko (Rodale)

10. "7 Years Younger: The Revolutionary 7-Week Anti-Aging Plan" by Editors of Good Housekeeping (Filipacchi)

11. "Wheat Belly Cookbook: 150 Recipes to Help You Lose the Wheat, Lose the Weight, and Find Your Path Back to Health" by William Davis (Rodale)

12. "Guinness World Records 2013" by Guinness World Records (Guinness World Records)

13. "The Virgin Diet: Drop 7 Foods, Lose 7 Pounds, Just 7 Days" by J.J. Virgin (Harlequin)

14. "May Cause Miracles: A 40-Day Guidebook of Subtle Shifts for Radical Change and Unlimited Happiness" by Gabrielle Bernstein (Harmony)

15. "Help, Thanks, Wow: The Three Essential Prayers" by Anne Lamott (Riverhead)

MASS MARKET PAPERBACKS

1. "Big Sky River" by Linda Lael Miller (Harlequin HQN)

2. "Odd Interlude: A Special Odd Thomas Adventure" by Dean Koontz (Bantam)

3. "Return to Sender" by Fern Michaels (Zebra)

4. "Montana" by Debbie Macomber (Harlequin Mira)

5. "Catch Me: A Detective D.D. Warren Novel" by Lisa Gardner (Signet)

6. "10th Anniversary" by James Patterson, Maxine Paetro (Vision)

7. "The Columbus Affair: A Novel" by Steve Berry (Ballantine)

8. "Full House" by Janet Evanovich (St. Martin's Press)

9. "Left for Dead: A Novel" by J.A. Jance (Pocket Books)

10. "Wyoming Bride: A Bitter Creek Novel" by Joan Johnston (Dell)

11. "Sea Glass Winter: A Shelter Bay Novel" by JoAnn Ross (Signet)

12. "Safe Haven" by Nicholas Sparks (Grand Central Publishing)

13. "After Tex" by Sherryl Woods (Harlequin Mira)

14. "Tom Clancy's Ghost Recon: Choke Point" by Peter Telep (Berkley)

15. "Shades of Gray: A KGI Novel" by Maya Banks (Berkley)

TRADE PAPERBACKS

1. "Proof of Heaven" by Eben Alexander (Simon & Schuster)

2. "Fifty Shades of Grey" by E.L. James (Vintage)

3. "Fifty Shades Darker" by E.L. James (Vintage)

4. "Fifty Shades Freed" by E.L. James (Vintage)

5. "Private London" by James Patterson (Grand Central Publishing)

6. "The Hobbit, Or There and Back Again" by J.R.R. Tolkien (Mariner Books)

7. "Reflected in You: A Crossfire Novel" by Sylvia Day (Berkley)

8. "Safe Haven" by Nicholas Sparks (Grand Central Publishing)

9. "The Paris Wife" by Paula McLain (Ballantine)

10. "Bared to You: A Crossfire Novel" by Sylvia Day (Berkley)

11. "Death Comes to Pemberley" by P.D. James (Vintage)

12. "Life of Pi" by Yann Martel (Mariner Books)

13. "The Perks of Being a Wallflower" by Stephen Chbosky (MTV Books)

14. "The Perfect Hope: Book Three of the Inn BoonsBoro Trilogy" by Nora Roberts (Berkley)

15. "To Heaven and Back" by Mary C. Neal (WaterBrook Press)

Copyright 2013 The Associated Press.

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WALL STREET JOURNAL BEST-SELLERS

The Associated Press

FICTION

1. "Diary of a Wimpy Kid: The Third Wheel" by Jeff Kinney (Amulet Books)

2. "Gone Girl" by Gillian Flynn (Crown Publishing Group)

3. "Empire and Honor" by W.E.B. Griffin and William Butterworth IV (Putnam Adult)

4. "The Racketeer" by John Grisham (Doubleday)

5. "Heroes of Olympus: The Mark of Athena" by Rick Riordan (Disney-Hyperion)

6. "Threat Vector" by Tom Clancy with Mark Greaney (Putnam)

7. "Cross Roads" by Wm. Paul Young (Faith/Words)

8. "I Funny" by James Patterson, Chris Grabenstein (Little, Brown)

9. "The Forgotten" by David Baldacci (Grand Central Publishing)

10. "Shadow Woman: A Novel" by Linda Howard (Ballantine)

NONFICTION

1. "Shred: The Revolutionary Diet" by Ian K. Smith (St. Martin's Press)

2. "Killing Kennedy" by Bill O'Reilly, Martin Dugard (Henry Holt and Co.)

3. "Jesus Calling: Enjoy Peace in His Presence" by Sarah Young (Thomas Nelson Publishers)

4. "The Wimpy Kid Do-It-Yourself" by Jeff Kinney (Amulet)

5. "Killing Lincoln" by Bill O'Reilly, Martin Dugard (Henry Holt & Co.)

6. "Barefoot Contessa Foolproof: Recipes You Can Trust" by Ina Garten (Clarkson Potter)

7. "I Declare: 31 Promises to Speak Over Your Life" by Joel Osteen (FaithWords)

8. "Thomas Jefferson: The Art of Power" by Jon Meacham (Random House)

9. "The World Until Yesterday: What Can We Learn from Traditional Societies" by Jared Diamond (Viking)

10. "No Easy Day" by Mark Owen with Kevin Maurer (Dutton Books)

FICTION E-BOOKS

1. "Hopeless" by Colleen Hoover (Self-published via Amazon Digital Services)

2. "Safe Haven" by Nicholas Sparks (Grand Central Publishing)

3. "Gone Girl" by Gillian Flynn (Crown Publishing Group)

4. "The Coincidence of Callie and Kayden" by Jessica Sorensen (Jessica Sorensen)

5. "Fifty Shades of Grey" by E.L. James (Vintage Books)

6. "Fifty Shades Darker" by E.L. James (Vintage Books)

7. "The Hobbit" by J.R.R Tolkien (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt)

8. "Someone to Love" by Addison Moore (Addison Moore)

9. "The Perks of Being a Wallflower" by Stephen Chbosky (MTV Books)

10. "Fifty Shades Freed" by E.L. James (Vintage Books)

NONFICTION E-BOOKS

1. "Man's Search for Meaning" by Viktor E. Franki (Beacon Press)

2. "Shred: The Revolutionary Diet" by Ian K. Smith (St. Martin's Press)

3. "Proof of Heaven" by Eben Alexander (Simon & Schuster)

4. "Killing Kennedy" by Bill O'Reilly, Martin Dugard (Henry Holt and Co.)

5. "The Omnivore's Dilemma" by Michael Pollan (Penguin Group)

6. "The 8-Hour Diet: Watch the Pounds Disappear Without Watching What You Eat" by David Zinczenko (Rodale)

7. "Let's Pretend This Never Happened" by Jenny Lawson (Penguin Group)

8. "Killing Lincoln" by Bill O'Reilly, Martin Dugard (Henry Holt & Co.)

9. "No Easy Day" by Mark Owen with Kevin Maurer (Penguin Group)

10. "I Suck at Girls" by Justin Halpern (HarperCollins)

Copyright 2013 The Associated Press.

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USA TODAY BEST-SELLERS

The Associated Press

1. "Safe Haven" by Nicholas Sparks (Grand Central Publishing)

2. "Hopeless" by Colleen Hoover (Self-published via Amazon Digital Services)

3. "Gone Girl" by Gillian Flynn (Crown)

4. "The Hobbit" by J.R.R. Tolkien (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt)

5. "Fifty Shades of Grey" by E.L. James (Vintage)

6. "Diary of a Wimpy Kid: The Third Wheel" by Jeff Kinney (Amulet Books)

7. "Fifty Shades Darker" by E.L. James (Vintage)

8. "Fifty Shades Freed" by E.L. James (Vintage)

9. "The Perks of Being a Wallflower" by Stephen Chbosky (MTV)

10. "Proof of Heaven" by Eben Alexander (Simon & Schuster)

11. "The Forgotten" by David Baldacci (Grand Central Publishing)

12. "The Racketeer" by John Grisham (Doubleday)

13. "Shades of Gray: A KGI Novel" by Maya Banks (Berkley)

14. "Private London" by James Patterson and Mark Pearson (Grand Central Publishing)

15. "Shadow Woman: A Novel" by Linda Howard (Ballantine)

16. "Shred: The Revolutionary Diet" by Ian K. Smith (St. Martin's Press)

17. "Mockingjay" by Suzanne Collins (Scholastic)

18. "Catching Fire" by Suzanne Collins (Scholastic)

19. "Merry Christmas, Alex Cross" by James Patterson (Little, Brown)

20. "Big Sky River" by Linda Lael Miller (HQN)

21. "Notorious Nineteen: A Stephanie Plum Novel" by Janet Evanovich (Bantam)

22. "Empire and Honor" by W.E.B. Griffin and William Butterworth IV (Putnam Adult)

23. "Reflected in You: A Crossfire Novel" by Sylvia Day (Berkley)

24. "Threat Vector" by Tom Clancy, Mark Greaney (Putnam Adult)

25. "Life of Pi" by Yann Martel (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt)

For the extended, interactive and searchable version of this list, visit http://books.usatoday.com/list/index

Copyright 2013 The Associated Press.

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Review: Jack Swyteck returns in 'Blood Money'

By JEFF AYERS, Associated Press

"Blood Money" (Harper), by James Grippando

James Grippando continues to deliver great legal suspense with his latest thriller, "Blood Money." His hero, Miami criminal defense attorney Jack Swyteck, has appeared in previous novels, but this case becomes his most personal.

According to the general public and the media, Swyteck's client Sydney Bennett is guilty of murdering her 2-year-old daughter. Everyone but the court has already convicted her, and when the verdict is not guilty, hysteria ensues. Swyteck receives death threats and is accused of taking blood money, but his main concern involves getting his client out of prison safely. On the night of Bennett's release, a woman who looks like her is assaulted and ends up in a coma. The media blames Swyteck, but the young woman's parents want answers and they go to Swyteck for help.

The mystery itself is a bit obvious, but Grippando's examination of corporate media and the power of the court of public opinion elevate "Blood Money." Swyteck has to work within the law to save his client, while dodging blows from a zealous TV reporter and countering the spreading lies in media reports. Every step he takes is scrutinized and examined in the world of instant news. Swyteck's career and his client's life hang in the balance.

The courtroom antics are fun and will remind readers of the best of Perry Mason. Grippando has been at the top of the legal-thriller ladder for some time, and "Blood Money" will enhance his reputation and readership.

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Review: Clark's new mystery an irresistible read

By WAKA TSUNODA, Associated Press

"Footprints in the Sand" (William Morrow), by Mary Jane Clark

Piper Donovan, the heroine of a mystery series by Mary Jane Clark, is fearless and inquisitive, and this trait often puts her in danger. In "Footprints in the Sand," the latest in the series, she finds herself in a particularly lethal situation.

She isn't a professional sleuth. A struggling actress, Piper designs wedding cakes part time in her mother's New Jersey bakery. And every time she bakes a cake, she somehow ends up having a close encounter with a murderer.

The latest episode unfolds on the idyllic barrier island of Siesta Key, Fla., where Piper's cousin Kathy is looking forward to glorious nuptials. But things soon start to go wrong.

Her bridesmaid, Shelley, disappears, and her blood-stained car is found. More disturbing events follow as the anonymous man responsible for Shelley's disappearance struggles to silence any witnesses.

Who is this evil character? Is it the groom, Shelley's one-time boyfriend? Or is it the best man, a former drug dealer? It could be anyone, including the boyfriend of the bride's widowed mother, Kathy's wedding planner and a local doctor with a thriving practice.

Mystery fans will have a great time trying to identify the culprit before Piper does, but the novel offers a lot more than a mystery's usual puzzle-solving fun. Like other Clark novels, it also packs the heart-pounding suspense usually found in top-notch thrillers.

This makes "Footprints" an irresistible read with wide appeal.

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Review: Justin Cronin returns to apocalyptic saga

By DOUGLASS K. DANIEL, Associated Press

"The Twelve" (Ballantine), by Justin Cronin

The middle book in a trilogy faces a striking challenge. It must match the interest and appeal created by the first book while advancing the story with enough surprises that readers will believe their investment of time and emotion will pay off in the final installment.

Justin Cronin's "The Twelve" walks a fine line in meeting that challenge. It returns us to a horrible, fascinating future dominated by vampirelike creatures called "virals," created by a military experiment gone wrong. As in "The Passage," published in 2010, Cronin presents multiple storylines, one as the virus takes hold and civilization falls apart and others a few generations later as the world tries to redefine what's normal.

Reading "The Twelve" without the benefit and background of the first book would be as unwise as venturing out at night, the prime feeding time for the virals. "The Passage" brilliantly creates a bloody dystopia, and its sequel cannot help but be a continuation, however welcome, instead of a revelation.

At first, a been-there, done-that quality tempers "The Twelve." As in the initial book, a familiar if exciting opening section follows a particular group of survivors as they try to cope with the first wave of the virus. Then, some eight decades later, battle-hardened veterans take on the core virals and their minions in an effort to end their reign over what had been the Midwest -- an echo of the climax of the first book.

Yet "Passage" fans shouldn't be dismayed -- not at all. At one point the story takes a turn that leaves such familiarities far behind. What remains in the forefront is the fine storytelling, particularly in its attention to character, that turned Cronin's first book into one of the year's best.

Whether Cronin can achieve an apocalyptic hat trick with the trilogy's final volume will leave readers anxious. It's going to be tough going -- but then, what isn't in viral America?

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Review: 'Blood Gospel' is supernatural thriller

By JEFF AYERS, Associated Press

"The Blood Gospel" (William Morrow), by James Rollins and Rebecca Cantrell

James Rollins, king of the action-adventure thriller, and award-winning novelist Rebecca Cantrell, author of four Hannah Vogel mysteries set in pre-World War II Nazi Germany, combine their talents and create a supernatural page turner in "The Blood Gospel."

Fans will discover a storytelling voice vastly different from the authors' individual novels. Rollins uses science and history to deepen the suspense in his books. Cantrell's stories ooze atmosphere, transporting the reader into a vivid world as if being transported back in time. Together they have introduced a series that will certainly create as much debate and scrutiny as Dan Brown's "The Da Vinci Code."

Dr. Erin Granger and her team are examining an archaeological dig in Caesarea, Israel, when she's asked to assist in Masada. A hidden tomb has been uncovered in the aftermath of a devastating earthquake. A deadly gas was released during the quake, and the sole survivor is shocked to discover that his cancer-ridden body is now disease-free.

Granger teams up with a military forensic expert and a Vatican priest to examine the tomb. While unearthing a sarcophagus, the team is attacked by strange creatures.

"The Blood Gospel" is a combination of religious conspiracy and another popular genre, and to reveal more about the concept behind this engaging novel would be a crime.

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Review: Book sheds light on traditional societies

By RASHA MADKOUR, Associated Press

"The World Until Yesterday: What Can We Learn From Traditional Societies?" (Viking), by Jared Diamond

What if, in trying to figure out the best way to lead our lives, we could conduct tests on the different methods?

According to author Jared Diamond, such trials are already taking place. In his new book, "The World Until Yesterday," Diamond argues: "Traditional societies in effect represent thousands of natural experiments in how to construct a human society. They have come up with thousands of solutions to human problems" -- solutions, he points out, that are different from those adopted by modern, industrialized societies.

Diamond, who wrote the Pulitzer Prize-winning "Guns, Germs, and Steel" and is a geography professor at UCLA, warns against romanticizing and idealizing the past, while encouraging readers to consider that some traditional practices may be a better fit for us. What follows is an extensive, textbooklike examination of issues ranging from conflict resolution to treatment of the elderly, language diversity to salt intake.

In a striking anecdote early on, Diamond relates the story of a New Guinean boy who was killed after darting in front of a minibus. Through time-honored traditions, the driver (and his company) paid the boy's family "sorry money" and participated in a "say-sorry" ceremony. Both sides took time to talk -- the driver's boss said the food and money they were bringing were nothing compared with the life of the child; the boy's father acknowledged the death was an accident. They then shared a meal together and shook hands at the end. Diamond contrasts this to the civil lawsuit and criminal charges that would likely be brought in the United States.

Allo-parenting -- where a child's regular caregivers extend beyond just the parents -- is another area where tradition appears to trump modern practices, Diamond says. Grandparents, aunts, uncles, other adults and older siblings play pivotal roles in caring for children, providing diverse influences and sharing in the responsibility. Anthropologists are often struck by the "precocious development of social skills among children in those societies," Diamond says, "and they speculate that the richness of allo-parental relationships may provide part of the explanation."

Traditional practices can offer indirect lessons, too. Investors would be wise to take cues from the practices of Andean farmers, Diamond says. Their scattered plots were deemed by outsiders "appalling" in their inefficiency, yet the farmers' goals weren't to maximize time-averaged yields. What good are nine productive years if the tenth year has no yield, putting them at risk of starvation? Their goal, then, was to make sure yields never drop below a certain level. The diffuse plots account for variation and unpredictability in crop yield from field to field, year to year, Diamond writes. In the same vein, if you're depending on your investments to pay current expenses, you need to settle for a lower yield in exchange for more security and stability.

The book is liberally peppered with personal anecdotes from Diamond's various expeditions. He recounts one memorable incident where his New Guinean companions refused to sleep near a tall dead tree for fear it would fall and kill them. Diamond thought they were being absurd. But as months of forest camping went by, he realized that he heard a tree falling almost every day. As such, if New Guineans spend much of their lives camping, it behooves them to take precautions with repeated low-risk activities because the hazard is cumulative. The same can be said in modern societies with driving a car, Diamond argues.

While there is no shortage of thought-provoking material in the book, it's unclear whether a casual reader would have the patience to slog through some of the more mundane, drawn-out sections. In a chapter looking at human violence, Diamond mentions that the Kung of southern Africa had 22 homicides in 49 years -- then proceeds to detail each incident.

Still, Diamond's style is a model of explanatory writing, and he delivers on his premise that the past is worth revisiting.

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