BOOK NOTES: More book news, September 14, 2013

Compiled By Mary Louise Ruehr, Books Editor Published:

BOOK SALES

• Friends of Reed Memorial Library Book Sale: Sept. 19-22 (coinciding with Balloon A-Fair weekend) at 167 E. Main St., Ravenna. Sept. 19: Member's preview only 4-8 p.m.; Public sale: Sept. 20, 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.; Sept. 21, 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Sept. 22, 1 to 4 p.m. (Donation Day: Take books and leave a monetary donation.) Information: 330-296-2827, ext. 104.

• Windham Library Book Sale: Sept. 30-Oct. 4 during regular library hours at the library, 9005 Wilverne Drive. Hours are 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday and Friday, noon to 6:30 p.m. Tuesday and Thursday. The library is closed Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday. Information: 330-326-3145 or www.portagelibrary.org.

• Friends of Stow-Munroe Falls Public Library Fall Book Sale: Sept. 24-28, 3512 Darrow Road. Sept. 24: Patrons' Night, 5 to 8 p.m. Admission $5 per person for Friends members or $10 per person for non-members (includes membership donation of $5); Sept. 25: Friends Pre-Sale, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Friends membership required. Renew or purchase membership at the door; Sept. 25 to 28: Public sale (no entrance fee). Hours 1 to 8 p.m. Wednesday 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday; 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday; 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday (Bag Day). After 2 p.m. Saturday books are free for teachers and nonprofits. Information: 330-688-3295.

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BOOK CLUBS

• Your High School Reading List: Sept. 17 (Call for time), Kent Free Library, 312 W. Main St. -- "Walden" by Henry David Thoreau. Discuss classic works of literature on the third Tuesday of each month. No registration required. Copies available at the Check Out Desk. Information: 330-673-4414 or kflinfo@kentfreelibrary.org.

• Pizza & Pages: Noon to 1 p.m. Sept. 21, Kent Free Library -- "Hoot" by Carl Hiaasen. This monthly book club for teens, grades six to nine, includes pizza, a book discussion, trivia contests, and crafts based on the books. Registration is required and begins Sept. 14 and closes at 6 p.m. on Sept. 20. Information and to register: Stop by or call 330-673-4414.

• Mystery Mondays: 7 p.m. Sept. 30, Kent Free Library, 312 W. Main St. -- "Devil in the White City" by Erik Larson. Discuss mysteries on the last Monday of each month. No registration required. Copies available at the Check Out Desk. Information: 330-673-4414 or kflinfo@kentfreelibrary.org.

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Best-Sellers

PUBLISHERS WEEKLY BEST-SELLERS

The Associated Press

Week ending September 8th, 2013

HARDCOVER FICTION

1. "Never Go Back" by Lee Child (Delacorte)

2. "The Mayan Secrets" by Clive Cussler, Thomas Perry (Putnam)

3. "Styxx" by Sherrilyn Kenyon (St. Martin's)

4. "Dark Lycan" by Christine Feehan (Berkley)

5. "The Cuckoo's Calling" by Robert Galbraith (J.K. Rowling) (Little, Brown)

6. "Inferno" by Dan Brown (Doubleday)

7. "Mistress" by James Patterson/David Ellis (Little, Brown)

8. "And the Mountains Echoed" by Khaled Hosseini (Riverhead)

9. "Maddaddam" by Margaret Atwood (Doubleday/Talese)

10. "Rose Harbor in Bloom" by Debbie Macomber (Ballantine)

11. "How the Light Gets In" by Louise Penny (Minotaur)

12. "First Sight" by Danielle Steel (Delacorte)

13. "The Husband's Secret" by Liane Moriarty (Putnam/Amy Einhorn)

14. "The Bone Season: A Novel" by Samantha Shannon (Bloomsbury)

15. "The Kill List" by Frederick Forsythe (Putnam)

HARDCOVER NONFICTION

1. "Si-Cology 1" by Si Robertson (Howard Books)

2. "The Liberty Amendments" by Mark R. Levin (S&S/Threshold)

3. "Happy, Happy, Happy: My Life and Legacy as the Duck Commander" by Phil Robertson (Howard Books)

4. "Zealot" by Reza Aslan (Random House)

5. "The Duck Commander Family" by Willie Robertson, Korie Robertson and Mark Schlabach (Howard Books)

6. "Lean In" by Sheryl Sandberg (Knopf)

7. "Mission in a Bottle" by Seth Goldman (Crown Business)

8. "God Is Not Mad at You" by Joyce Meyer (FaithWords)

9. "Salinger" by David Shields (Simon & Schuster)

10. "Lawrence in Arabia" by Scott Anderson (Doubleday)

11. "This Town" by Mark Leibovich (Blue Rider Press)

12. "Life Code: The New Rules for Winning in the Real World" by Phil McGraw (Bird Street Books)

13. "The Butler" by Wil Haygood (Atria/37 Ink)

14. "Under Fire" by Fred Burton, Samuel M. Katz

15. "Ottolenghi: The Cookbook" by Yotam Ottolenghi (Ten Speed)

MASS MARKET PAPERBACKS

1. "The Racketeer" by John Grisham (Dell)

2. "The Forgotten" by David Baldacci (Grand Central)

3. "The Hero" by Robyn Carr (Mira)

4. "The Bone Bed" by Patricia Cornwell (Berkley)

5. "Big Sky Wedding" by Linda Lael Miller (Harlequin)

6. "The Last Man: A Novel" by Vince Flynn (Pocket Books)

7. "The Inn at Rose Harbor" by Debbie Macomber (Ballantine)

8. "Temptation" by Sherryl Woods (Mira)

9. "Deamond in the Rough" by Diana Palmer (Harlequin)

10. "Heart of Texas, Vol. 3" by Debbie Macomber (Mira)

11. "Webster's New World Dictionary" by Michael Agnes (Pocket Books)

12. "The Blood Gospel" by James Rollins, Rebecca Cantrell (Harper)

13. "The Husband List" by Janet Evanovich, Dorien Kelly (St. Martin's)

14. "Low Pressure" by Sandra Brown (Vision)

15. "The Arrangement" by Mary Balogh (Dell)

TRADE PAPERBACKS

1. "The Secret Keeper" by Beverly Lewis (Bethany House)

2. "The Racketeer" by John Grisham (Bantam)

3. "The Casual Vacancy" by J.K. Rowling (Little, Brown)

4. "Proof of Heaven" by Eben Alexander (Simon & Schuster)

5. "Winter of the World" by Ken Follett (NAL)

6. "Michael Symon's 5 in 5" by Michael Symon (Clarkson Potter)

7. "Alex Cross, Run" by James Patterson (Grand Central)

8. "I Declare" by Joel Osteen (FaithWords)

9. "The Silent Wife" by A.S.A. Harrison (Penguin)

10. "Private Berlin" by James Patterson and Mark Sullivan (Grand Central)

11. "Beautiful Ruins" by Jess Walter (Harper Perennial)

12. "Joyland" by Stephen King (Hard Case Crime)

13. "Inquebrantable: Mi Historia, A Mi Manera" by Jenni Rivera (Atria)

14. "Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail" by Cheryl Strayed (Vintage)

15. "DSM-5" by American Psychiatric Association (APA)

Copyright 2013 The Associated Press.

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WALL STREET JOURNAL BEST-SELLERS

The Associated Press

Best-Selling Books Week Ended September 8th.

FICTION

1. "Never Go Back" by Lee Child (Delacorte)

2. "The Mayan Secrets" by Clive Cussler (Penguin Group)

3. "Styxx" by Sherrilyn Kenyon (St. Martin's Press)

4. "Dark Lycan" by Christine Feehan (Berkley)

5. "The Fault in Our Stars" by John Green (Dutton Books)

6. "The Cuckoo's Calling" by Robert Galbraith (J.K. Rowling) (Little, Brown)

7. "The Fall of Five" by Pittacus Lore (HarperCollins)

8. "Inferno" by Dan Brown (Doubleday)

9. "Mistress" by James Patterson, David Ellis (Little, Brown)

10. "Wonder" by R.J. Palacio (Alfred A. Knopf Books for Young Readers)

NONFICTION

1. "Si-cology 1" by Si Robertson (Howard Books)

2. "The Liberty Amendments" by Mark Levin (Threshold Editions)

3. "Happy, Happy, Happy: My Life and Legacy as the Duck Commander" by Phil Robertson and Mark Schlabach (Howard Books)

4. "One Direction" by One Direction (HarperCollins)

5. "Jesus Calling: Enjoy Peace in His Presence" by Sarah Young (Thomas Nelson Publishers)

6. "StrengthsFinder 2.0" by Tom Rath (Gallup Press)

7. "Zealot" by Reza Aslan (Random House)

8. "The Duck Commander Family" by Willie Robertson (Howard Books)

9. "Lean In" by Sheryl Sandberg (Knopf)

10. "Mission in a Bottle" by Seth Goldman (Crown Business)

FICTION E-BOOKS

1. "Never Go Back" by Lee Child (Delacorte)

2. "The Husband's Secret" by Liane Moriarty (Penguin Group)

3. "Styxx" by Sherrilyn Kenyon (St. Martin's Press)

4. "Seduced" by Melody Anne (Gossamer Publishing)

5. "Dark Lycan" by Christine Feehan (Berkley)

6. "The Cuckoo's Calling" by Robert Galbraith (Little Brown)

7. "Transfer" by Veronic Roth (HarperCollins)

8. "The Mayan Secrets" by Clive Cussler (Penguin Group)

9. "Stripped" by H.M. Ward (Laree Bailey Press)

10. "Fifty Shades of Grey" by E.L. James (Vintage)

NONFICTION E-BOOKS

1. "Si-cology 1" by Si Robertson (Howard Books)

2. "E-Squared" by Pam Grout (Hay House)

3. "Sh*t My Dad Says" by Justin Halpern (HarperCollins)

4. "Orange Is the New Black" by Piper Kerman (Random House)

5. "Ketchup Is a Vegetable" by Robin O'Bryant (Greenforge Books)

6. "Happy, Happy, Happy" by Phil Robertson (Howard Books)

7. "Zealot" by Reza Aslan (Random House)

8. "Angels in the Realms of Heaven" by Kevin Basconi (Destiny Image)

9. "Brilliant Blunders" by Mario Livio (Simon & Schuster)

10. "The Butler" by Wil Haygood (Atria)

Copyright 2013 The Associated Press.

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USA TODAY BEST-SELLERS

The Associated Press

1. "Never Go Back" by Lee Child (Delacorte)

2. "Si-cology 1" by Si Robertson (Howard Books)

3. "The Racketeer" John Grisham (Dell)

4. "The Husband's Secret" by Liane Moriarty (Amy Einhorn Books/Putnam)

5. "Styxx" by Sherrilyn Kenyon (St. Martin's Press)

6. "Dark Lycan" by Christine Feehan (Berkley)

7. "The Mayan Secrets" by Clive Cussler, Thomas Perry (Putnam Adult)

8. "City of Bones" by Cassandra Clare (Margaret K. McElderry Books)

9. "The Hero" by Robyn Carr (Harlequin MIRA)

10. "The Cuckoo's Calling" by Robert Galbraith (J.K. Rowling) (Little, Brown)

11. "Seduced" by Melody Anne (Gossamer Publishing)

12. "Fifty Shades of Grey" by E.L. James (Vintage)

13. "Divergent" by Veronica Roth (Katherine Tegen Books)

14. "The Fault in Our Stars" by John Green (Dutton Children's)

15. "The Forgotten" by David Baldacci (Grand Central Publishing)

16. "City of Ashes" by Cassandra Clare (Margaret K. McElderry Books)

17. "Stripped" by H.M. Ward (Laree Bailey Press)

18. "Big Sky Wedding" by Linda Lael Miller (Harlequin HQN)

19. "The Transfer" by Veronica Roth (Katherine Tegen Books)

20. "Inferno" by Dan Brown (Knopf/Doubleday)

21. "City of Glass" by Cassandra Clare (Margaret K. McElderry Books)

22. "The Liberty Amendments" by Mark R. Levin (Threshold Editions)

23. "Mistress" by James Patterson, David Ellis (Little, Brown)

24. "Insurgent" by Veronica Roth (Katherine Tegen Books)

25. "Everything for Us" by M. Leighton (Berkley)

For the extended, interactive and searchable version of this list, visit http://books.usatoday.com/list/index

Copyright 2013 The Associated Press.

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Shacochis back with 'The Woman Who Lost Her Soul'

By Jennifer Kay | Associated Press

"The Woman Who Lost Her Soul" (Atlantic Monthly Press), by Bob Shacochis

It's hard to talk about "The Woman Who Lost Her Soul" without giving away too much of its intrigue. The novel starts off in U.S.-occupied Haiti, but it's not really just about Haiti. It's about the toll paid by individuals when humanitarian interventions peter out or fail, and that makes the novel's drama all the more heartbreaking and riveting.

The title of Bob Shacochis' first book in 10 years initially refers to a woman calling herself a photojournalist, making contacts in Haiti in the mid-1990s when the U.S. military occupied the Caribbean country. It's a turbulent time period that Shacochis knows well -- he wrote about his experiences embedded with U.S. Special Forces in Haiti in 1994 in the nonfiction work "The Immaculate Invasion."

Then Shacochis expands the story over five decades and three continents. He manages to cover the Cold War, the Balkans, the rise of Islamist extremism and Haiti's seemingly endless humanitarian crisis while exploring the photojournalist's disturbing family history.

It's a sweeping, expansive book grounded by details such as epic potholes in Haiti's roads and crowded ferry decks in Turkey. Without veering into conspiracy theories or melodrama, Shacochis builds for both his readers and his characters a sense that something important is being overlooked amid competing agendas.

"The Woman Who Lost Her Soul" is an elegant reminder that connections are made one by one -- but not everyone is playing the same game.

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Columbia sociologist goes 'rogue' in New York City

By Jessica Gresko | Associated Press

"Floating City: A Rogue Sociologist Lost and Found in New York's Underground Economy" (The Penguin Press), by Sudhir Venkatesh

A crack dealer. A madam. A porn store clerk. Those are just some of the characters that sociologist Sudhir Venkatesh introduces in his latest book, "Floating City."

Studying society's fringes isn't new for Venkatesh. As a doctorate student at the University of Chicago, he studied a city gang, and his research got a boost from its inclusion in the 2005 uber-best-seller "Freakonomics." Venkatesh followed up with his own book, "Gang Leader for a Day: A Rogue Sociologist Takes to the Streets."

In "Floating City," Venkatesh has moved from Chicago to New York, where he's now a sociology professor at Columbia University. But New York City is no Chicago, Venkatesh learns. The distinctions between race and class blur in this city.

He promises to show readers connections between the worlds of the elite and the poor in the city's underground economy. There is some of that, but less than readers might imagine. And the narrative thread can feel a little forced.

Still, for the price of the book, what readers get is an invitation. We get to hang out with Venkatesh as he travels and meets with sex workers and socialites, immigrants and madams, johns and drug dealers. And we get access to those experiences without sideways looks or the risk of getting a rap sheet.

Readers are there as a crack dealer from Harlem circulates at an art party as part of an attempt to break into the more upscale cocaine market, one with wealthy white clients. We observe as a group of prostitutes rents an apartment to attract a better clientele than they were getting when working in cars and motels. And we sit alongside Venkatesh as he shares drinks with businessmen who describe why they frequent prostitutes.

At the same time, it seems like Venkatesh is writing "Floating City" because he owes a debt. He told people their stories would be in a book and now has to pay up. That's OK. It just doesn't seem like Venkatesh is enjoying the process.

There's one more thing that's irritating: Early on, Venkatesh tells readers that some sociologists at his Ivy-League institution look down on writing a book for the masses. And he describes being caught between wanting to be taken seriously as an academic and telling stories and reaching a larger audience. But that internal torture sounds hollow, and it seems pretty clear that Venkatesh, well-known already, likes the spotlight of mass appeal. So why not just drop the pretense and write?

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Review: Billy Crystal looks back on his life

By Jeff Ayers | Associated Press

"Still Foolin' 'Em: Where I've Been, Where I'm Going, and Where the Hell Are My Keys?" (Henry Holt and Company), by Billy Crystal

Billy Crystal looks back on his life and career in "Still Foolin' 'Em: Where I've Been, Where I'm Going, and Where the Hell Are My Keys?" He writes in such a relaxed style that the reading experience feels more like he's talking about his life and thoughts over a friendly cup of coffee.

The book includes essays about his age or sex, and these sections are clearly designed to be funny. The 65-year-old comedian delivers numerous chuckles and flat-out belly laughs.

Crystal reflects on growing up, meeting his wife and getting his start in comedy. He provides behind-the-scenes material for some of his biggest career achievements, including the film "When Harry Met Sally ..." and the TV series "Soap." The personal anecdotes resonate, and reading about the ups and downs of his life is inspiring. Just when he gets close to being maudlin, another humorous essay pops up to lighten the mood.

One of the themes running throughout his stories is his age, and it seems at times that he feels like everything is coming to an end soon. But here is a man who pursued his dreams, achieved them and exceeded beyond even his lofty expectations.

Crystal has the charisma, humor and down-home charm that fans have loved over the years. And the love for his family clearly shines through the words as well.

To quote one of his most famous characters, Billy Crystal, "you look mahvalous."

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Novel offers vision of hunting trip gone awry

By Ann Levin | Associated Press

"Goat Mountain" (Harper), by David Vann

Gun owners like to say they teach their children to never point a loaded weapon at another person. But what if a father let his 11-year-old son peer through the scope of a loaded rifle at a poacher? What if the inevitable catastrophe occurred? And what if the father decided not to report it to the authorities?

Already these people would have violated several rules of civilized society, and over the course of "Goat Mountain," a violent and disturbing new novel from award-winning writer David Vann, things will get much worse.

The story is narrated by that unnamed boy, who is looking back as an adult at the life-changing events of that trip and trying to remember what he felt as a child. "Some part in me just wanted to kill, constantly and without end," he remembers feeling at the start of the journey, perched in the back of his dad's pickup watching quail scurrying along the road.

Over the next few days, his father will string up a human corpse over the campsite; his grandfather will try to kill him; his father's best friend will be hunted like an animal; and he'll shoot his first buck -- a family rite of passage -- and be forced to eat its still-warm liver and heart. Then he'll have to castrate the beast -- "what made the buck a man needed to be removed also" -- and haul its 120-pound carcass back to camp at night alone.

This is not a book for the queasy of stomach nor for the literal-minded reader. It's loaded with allusions to the biblical story of Cain and Abel, the crucifixion and resurrection of Christ, and the half-human, half-animal figures of Greek myth. "We drink the blood of Christ so we can become animals again," Vann suggests in one portentous passage.

The only relief from the guts and gore -- human and animal -- are Vann's evocative descriptions of the rugged backcountry of Northern California, where the men go hunting on the family's property. And he can be funny about the price we pay for civilization, as in this description of his grandfather: He "had become something modern, an obesity pumped full of insulin and pills and unable to walk through a forest for miles. A thousand generations, tens of thousands of years, ended by him."

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