BOOK NOTES: More book news, March 8, 2014

Compiled by Mary Louise Ruehr, Books Editor Published:

BOOK CLUBS

• Pierce Streetsboro Library Book Discussion Club: 3 p.m. March 10, library meeting room, 8990 Kirby Lane — “Heading Out to Wonderful” by Robert Goolrick, a novel that takes place in 1940s Virginia about a stranger who comes to town and meets a woman who is already taken. Light refreshments courtesy of the Friends of Pierce Streetsboro Library. Copies available. To register: 330-626-4458. 

• Adult Book Discussion: 7-8 p.m. March 11, Reed Memorial Library, 167 E. Main St., Ravenna — “The Mistress of the Art of Death” by Ariana Franklin. Sent to medieval Cambridge to exonerate Jewish prisoners who have been accused of murdering four children, Adelia discovers that the killer may be a former crusader. Copies available. Information: 330-296-2827, ext. 200.

• Read the Classics Book Club: 7 p.m. March 18, Kent Free Library, 312 W. Main St. — “Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl” by Harriet Jacobs. No registration required. Copies available. Information: 330-673-4414.

• Kid Lit for Grown-Ups: 6:30 p.m. March 20, Kent Free Library, 312 W. Main St. — “Counting by 7s” by Holly Goldberg Sloan and “Every Day” by David Levitan. No registration required. Copies available. Information: 330-673-4414.

• Mystery Mondays: 7 p.m. March 31, second floor meeting room, Kent Free Library, 312 W. Main St. — “The Surgeon”  Tess Gerritsen. Copies available. No registration required. Information: 330-673-4414.

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AUTHOR VISITS

• Local author Sharon R. Hunter will discuss her romance novel “Love On the Ranch” at 2 p.m. March 9 at Reed Memorial Library, 167 E. Main St., Ravenna. Free, no registration required. Information: call 330-296-2827, ext. 200.

• Nick Shamhart, author of “The Fog Within,” will appear at the Randolph Community Center, located behind the Randolph Library at 1639 S.R. 44, at 6 p.m. March 11. Books will be available for purchase and signing. All proceeds go to “Autism Speaks.” Ffree and open to the public. Registration requested by calling the library at 330-325-7003.

• Rachael Herron, author of “Pack Up the Moon,” will visit The Learned Owl Book Shop, 204 N. Main St. in Hudson, from 1 to 3 p.m. March 22. Information: 330-653-2252.

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BOOK SALES

• Friends of Reed Memorial Library Book Sale: March 13-16, 167 E. Main St., Ravenna. Members-only preview night 1 to 8 p.m. March 13; open to public 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. March 14, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. March 15, 1:30 to 4 p.m. March 16 (Educators’ donation day; exchange books for a monetary donation). Information: 330-296-2827, ext. 104.

•Friends of Aurora Memorial Library’s spring book sale: Members-only from 3 to 6 p.m. March 13. Memberships can be purchased at the door. Open to the public 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. March 14 and 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. March 15. Lower level gallery of the library building, 115 E. Pioneer Trail.

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Best-Sellers

PUBLISHERS WEEKLY BEST-SELLERS

The Associated Press

Week ending 3/2/14

HARDCOVER FICTION

1. “The Chase” by Janet Evanovich and Lee Goldberg (Bantam)

2. “Private L.A.” by James Patterson and Mark Sullivan (Little, Brown)

3. “Concealed in Death” by J.D. Robb (Putnam Adult)

4. “The Undead Pool” by Kim Harrison (Harper Voyager)

5. “The Invention of Wings” by Sue Monk Kidd (Viking Adult)

6. “The Goldfinch” by Donna Tartt (Little, Brown)

7. “Killer” by Jonathan Kellerman (Ballantine)

8. “Still Life with Bread Crumbs” by Anna Quindlen (Random House)

9. “Sycamore Row” by John Grisham (Doubleday)

10. “One More Thing” by B.J. Novak (Knopf)

11. “The First Phone Call from Heaven” by Mitch Albom (Harper)

12. “First Love” by James Patterson and Emily Raymond (Little, Brown)

13. “The Museum of Extraordinary Things” by Alice Hoffman (Scribner)

14. “The Martian” by Andy Weir (Crown)

15. “Bark” by Lorrie Moore (Knopf)

HARDCOVER NONFICTION

1. “The Blood Sugar Solution 10-Day Detox Diet” by Mark Hyman (Little, Brown)

2. “The Virgin Diet Cookbook” by J.J. Virgin (Grand Central Publishing)

3. “A Short Guide to a Long Life” by David B. Agus (Simon & Schuster)

4. “Killing Jesus” by Bill O’Reilly, Martin Dugard (Henry Holt)

5. “The Future of the Mind” by Michio Kaku (Doubleday)

6. “The Body Book” by Cameron Diaz (Harper Wave)

7. “Things That Matter” by Charles Krauthammer (Crown Forum)

8. “Super Shred” by Ian K. Smith (St. Martin’s Press)

9. “Grain Brain” by David Perlmutter (Little, Brown)

10. “Duty” by Robert M. Gates (Knopf)

11. “David and Goliath” by Malcolm Gladwell (Little, Brown)

12. “The Daniel Plan” by Rick Warren (Zondervan)

13. “George Washington’s Secret Six” by Brian Kilmeade (Sentinel)

14. “The Sixth Extinction” by Elizabeth Kolbert (Henry Holt)

15. “I Am a Church Member” by Thom S. Rainer (B&H)

MASS MARKET PAPERBACKS

1. “The Chance” by Robyn Carr (Harlequin MIRA)

2. “The Hit” by David Baldacci (Grand Central Publishing)

3. “North to Alaska” by Debbie Macomber (Mira)

4. “Tell Me” by Lisa Jackson (Zebra)

5. “The Heist” by Janet Evanovich and Lee Goldberg (Bantam)

6. “Alex Cross, Run” by James Patterson (Vision)

7. “Six Years” by Harlan Coben (Signet)

8. “The Witness” by Nora Roberts (Jove)

9. “One Heart to Win” by Johanna Lindsey (Pocket)

10. “Until the End of Time” by Danielle Steel (Dell)

11. “Vampire Most Wanted” by Lynsay Sands (Avon)

12. “Girl Missing’ by Tess Gerritsen (Ballantine)

13. “A Man’s Heart” by Debbie Macomber (Mira)

14. “The English Girl” by Daniel Silva (Harper)

15. “The Eye of God” by James Rollins (Harper)

TRADE PAPERBACKS

1. “Second Honeymoon” by James Patterson and Howard Roughan (Grand Central Publishing)

2. “Orphan Train” by Christina Baker Kline (William Morrow Paperbacks)

3. “Four Blood Moons” by John Hagee (Worthy)

4. “The Monuments Men” by Robert M. Edsel (Back Bay Books)

5. “Lone Survivor” by Marcus Luttrell (Back Bay Books)

6. “Evening Stars” by Susan Mallery (Mira)

7. “Winter’s Tale” by Mark Helprin (HMH/Mariner)

8. “A Week in Winter” by Maeve Binchy (Anchor)

9. “Philomena” by Martin Sixsmith (Penguin)

10. “Cockroaches” by Jo Nesbo (Vintage)

11. “Wild” by Cheryl Strayed (Vintage)

12. “Deadline” by Sandra Brown (Grand Central Publishing)

13. “Twelve Years a Slave” by Solomon Northup (HarperPerrenial)

14. “Baseball America Prospect Handbook” by Baseball America (Baseball America)

15. “Life After Life” by Kate Atkinson (Back Bay Books)

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press.

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WALL STREET JOURNAL BEST-SELLERS

The Associated Press

Best-Selling Books Week Ended Mar. 2

FICTION

1. “Green Eggs and Ham” by Dr. Seuss (Random House)

2. “One Fish Two Fish” by Dr. Seuss (Random House)

3. “The Cat in the Hat” by Dr. Seuss (Random House)

4. “Insurgent” by Veronica Roth (Katherine Tegan Books)

5. “The Fault in Our Stars” by John Green (Dutton Books)

6. “Fox in Socks” by Dr. Seuss (Random House)

7. “Allegiant” by Veronica Roth (Katherine Tegen Books)

8. “Hop on Pop” by Dr. Seuss (Random House)

9. “Dr. Seuss’s ABC” by Dr. Seuss (Random House)

10. “Oh The thinks You Can think” by Dr. Seuss (Random House)

NONFICTION

1. “The Blood Sugar Solution 10-Day Detox Diet” by Mark Hyman (Little, Brown)

2. “Jesus Calling” by Sarah Young (Thomas Nelson)

3. “Oh, Say Can You Say Di-No-Saur” by Bonnie Worth (Random House)

4. “The Virgin Diet Cookbook” by J.J. Virgin (Grand Central Publishing)

5. “A Short Guide to a Long Life” by David B. Agus (Simon & Schuster)

6. “Killing Jesus: A History” by Bill O’Reilly & Martin Dugard (Henry Holt & Co.)

7. “There’s No Place Like Space” by Tish Rabe (Random House)

8. “The Future of the Mind” by Michio Kaku (Doubleday)

9. “Strengths Finder” by Tom Rath (Gallup)

10. “The Body Book” by Cameron Diaz (Harper Wave)

FICTION E-BOOKS

1. “Divergent” by Veronica Roth (Katherine Tegen Books)

2. “The Chance” by Robyn Carr (Harlequin MIRA)

3. “Friends—And Then Some” by Debbie Macomber (Random House)

4. “Insurgent” by Veronica Roth (Katherine Tegen Books)

5. “The Chase” by Janet Evanovich and Lee Goldberg (Bantam)

6. “The Undead Pool” by Kim Harrison (Harper Voyager)

7. “Allegiant” by Veronica Roth (Katherine Tegen Books)

8. “The Fault in Our Stars” by John Green (Dutton Books)

9. “Take a Chance” by Abbi Glines (Atria Books)

10. “The Arrangement 14” by H.M. Ward (Laree Bailey Press)

NONFICTION E BOOKS

1. “Twelve Years a Slave” by Solomon Northup (HarperCollins)

2. “Unbroken” by Lauren Hillenbrand (Random House)

3. “The Blood Sugar Solution 10-Day Detox Diet” by Mark Hyman (Little, Brown)

4. “Philomena” by Martin Sixsmith (Penguin)

5. “The Monuments Men” by Robert M. Edsel (Center Street)

6. “Story of the Trapp Family Singers” by Maria Augusta Trapp (HarperCollins)

7. “Lone Survivor” by Marcus Luttrell and Patrick Robinson (Little, Brown)

8. “The Future of the Mind” by Michio Kaku (Doubleday)

9. “Killing Jesus: A History” by Bill O’Reilly & Martin Dugard (Macmillan)

10. “The Norman Conquest” by Marc Morris (Pegasus Books)

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press.

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USA TODAY BEST-SELLERS

The Associated Press

1. “Divergent” by Veronica Roth (Katherine Tegen Books)

2. “The Fault in Our Stars” by John Green (Dutton’s Children)

3. “The Chance” by Robyn Carr (Harlequin MIRA)

4. “Insurgent” by Veronica Roth (Katherine Tegen Books)

5. “Allegiant” by Veronica Roth (Katherine Tegen Books)

6. “The Chase” by Janet Evanovich and Lee Goldberg (Bantam)

7. “The Undead Pool” by Kim Harrison (Harper Voyager)

8. “Friends—And Then Some” by Debbie Macomber (Random House)

9. “The Blood Sugar Solution 10-Day Detox Diet” by Mark Hyman (Little, Brown)

10. “Private L.A.” by James Patterson and Mark Sullivan (Little, Brown)

11. “Concealed in Death” by J.D. Robb (Putnam Adult)

12. “Green Eggs and Ham” by Dr. Seuss (Random House)

13. “The Book Thief” by Markus Zusak (Knopf Books for Young Readers)

14. “The Goldfinch” by Donna Tartt (Little, Brown)

15. “One Fish Two Fish Red Fish Blue Fish” by Dr. Seuss (Random House)

16. “The Hit” by David Baldacci (Grand Central Publishing)

17. “The Husband’s Secret” by Liane Moriarty (Amy Einhorn Books/Putnam)

18. “Dr. Seuss’s ABC” by Dr. Seuss (Random House Books for Young Readers)

19. “Take a Chance” by Abbi Glines (Atria Books)

20. “The Invention of Wings” by Sue Monk Kidd (Viking Adult)

21. “The Monuments Men” by Robert M. Edsel (Center Street)

22. “Lone Survivor” by Marcus Luttrell and Patrick Robinson (Little, Brown)

23. “The Cat in the Hat” by Dr. Seuss (Random House)

24. “Sycamore Row” by John Grisham (Doubleday)

25. “The Arrangement 14” by H.M. Ward (Laree Bailey Press)

For the extended, interactive and searchable version of this list, visit http://books.usatoday.com/list/index

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press.

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Reviews from McClatchy-Tribune:

“Little Demon in the City of Light” by Steven Levingston; Doubleday ($26.95)

“Little Demon in the City of Light” tells the riveting story of two misfits who almost got away with murder. When they didn’t, their trial became its own exposition, matching the latest breakthroughs in criminology with some of the greatest names of the age.

Steven Levingston’s title nods to Erik Larson’s bestselling “The Devil in the White City,” a gripping history that braids the tales of the World’s Columbian Exposition of 1893 and the serial killer who preyed on the women of Chicago.

“Little Demon” focuses on a single murder case, but what a case it was. It unfolded at a time when forensic science was just beginning and hypnotism was in its heyday. Its characters could have come from fiction.

—By Maureen McCarthy, Minneapolis Star Tribune

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“What Makes This Book So Great: Re-Reading the Classics of Science Fiction and Fantasy” by Jo Walton; Tor ($26.99)

What makes Jo Walton’s new book, “What Makes This Book So Great,” so great indeed is that it champions adults reading for pleasure, and in Walton’s case rereading for pleasure.

“I am talking about books because I love books,” she writes. “I’m not standing on a mountain peak holding them at arm’s length and issuing Olympian pronouncements about them. I’m reading them in the bath and shouting with excitement because I have noticed something that is really really cool.”

What makes her book so great is that she’s a pretty terrific writer herself. The author of multiple fantasy and alternate-history novels, Walton has won both the Hugo and Nebula Awards for “Among Others” (2012), one of the most bookish great science fiction and fantasy, or SFF, novels ever.

—By Jim Higgins, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

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“Kinder Than Solitude” by Yiyun Li. Random House ($26)

The plot of “Kinder Than Solitude” is a kind of murder mystery. As it opens in Beijing, Boyang is making funeral arrangements for Shaoai, a family friend who has just died after a chemical poisoning 21 years earlier left her physically and cognitively disabled. Was Shaoai trying to kill herself, or was she killed by Ruyu, the timid, depressed orphan girl adopted into the family? And how much was that depression stoked by Moran, another friend?

Those questions give the novel its narrative shape, but they’re also largely beside the point. For Li, whodunit is less interesting than how the poisoning emotionally straitjacketed everybody. Boyang is a cynical womanizer who feels that “this world, like many people in it, inevitably treats a man better when he has little kindness to spare for it.” Ruyu lives in the Bay Area as a part-time housekeeper for a wealthy woman whose neuroses over the slightest problems give Ruyu herself an “exemption from participating in life.” In Massachusetts, Moran is a workaday chemist who strives to keep her life in just-so order, “a savage routine that cleansed her life to sterility.”

Yet this is not a woe-is-them tale: Li doesn’t pass judgment on her characters for their hyper-austere responses to a childhood calamity.

—By Mark Athitakis, Newsday

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“The Tooth Fairy: Parents, Lovers, and Other Wayward Deities (A Memoir)” by Clifford Chase; The Overlook Press ($24.95)

“I write this in the hope that aphorism-like statements, when added to one another, might accrue to make some larger statement that will placate despair,” Clifford Chase writes at the beginning of “The Tooth Fairy,” a memoir in fragments.

Most of his reflections, confessions and observations are only a few lines long. Some are merely odd, random asides (“In his spare time, my ophthalmologist was an amateur magician”), while others are more affecting: “Ashamed of my life, including the shame itself.” He tosses out excerpts from his journals, amusing and disturbing scenes from dreams, and obsesses over interactions with therapists, friends, his difficult parents and romantic partners.

Throughout, Chase is haunted by his sexuality. In his college years in California, he tries desperately to summon romantic feelings for women — but hadn’t kissed a girl since he was 14 and had never had sex. Shy, intellectual and introverted, Chase finds an on-and-off girlfriend, all the while harboring a desire for men. “The odd nature of the closet,” he writes, “the open secret, not to others but to oneself.”

—By Carmela Ciuraru, Newsday

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“Suspicion Nation” by Lisa Bloom; Counterpoint ($25)

The subtitle of legal pundit Lisa Bloom’s new book, “Suspicion Nation,” is a bit misleading when it claims to be “the inside story” of the killing of Trayvon Martin and the trial that followed.

There are few, if any, behind-the-scenes revelations in “Suspicion Nation.” Anyone who followed the 2013 trial of shooter George Zimmerman will be familiar with Bloom’s account of the case. And in a divided United States, millions followed the story obsessively, joining competing pro-Trayvon and pro-Zimmerman Greek choruses on social media.

At its best, “Suspicion Nation” is a thorough evisceration of the amateurish job done by the Florida prosecutors who tried Zimmerman. At its worst, it’s like turning on the TV and listening to yet another annoying television pundit make sport of a human tragedy. Bloom is, in fact, a television pundit, as well as being the daughter of high-profile lawyer Gloria Allred.

—By Hector Tobar, Los Angeles Times

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“Black Horizon” by James Grippando; Harper ($25.99)

In “Black Horizon,” Grippando explores a disaster that has affected Florida in the past — a devastating oil spill — and creates an intriguing political spin by showing how this could affect relations between the United States and Cuba. But Grippando also ladles a love story and the ever-reliable theme of greed to give his 11th Jack Swyteck novel an even more solid plot.

Grippando has become a master at taking “ripped from the headlines” events — in this case the 2010 Deepwater Horizon spill — and turning them into involving thrillers that, somehow, do not succumb to sensationalism. Grippando achieves this by continuing to focus on characters, especially showing new sides of Jack. Crisp dialogue and an insider’s view of Florida elevate “Black Horizon,” as do the evocative scenes set in Cuba.

—By Oline H. Cogdill, Sun Sentinel

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© 2014, McClatchy-Tribune

Distributed by MCT Information Services

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