More book news, August 30, 2014

Compiled by Mary Louise Ruehr, Books Editor Published:

PUBLISHERS WEEKLY BEST-SELLERS

The Associated Press

Week ending 8/24/2014

HARDCOVER FICTION

1. “Mean Streak” by Sandra Brown (Grand Central)

2. “Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage” by Haruki Murakami (Knopf)

3. “Love Letters” by Debbie Macomber (Ballantine)

4. “The 6th Extinction” by James Rollins (William Morrow)

5. “Big Little Lies” by Liane Moriarty (Putnam/Amy Einhorn)

6. “A Perfect Life” by Danielle Steel (Delacorte)

7. “Tom Clancy Support and Defend” by Mark Greaney (G.P. Putnam’s Sons)

8. “Adultery” by Paulo Coelho (Knopf)

9. “The Heist” by Daniel Silva (Harper)

10. “The Goldfinch” Donna Tartt (Little,,Brown)

11. “Invisible” by Patterson/Ellis (Little, Brown)

12. “The Book of Life” by Deborah Harkness (Viking)

13. “We Are Not Ourselves” by Matthew Thomsa (Simon & Schuster)

14. “Adulterio” by Paulo Coelho (Vintage Espanol)

15. “All the Light We Cannot See” by Anthony Doerr (Scribner)

HARDCOVER NONFICTION

1. “Dungeons & Dragons: Players Handbook, 5th Ed.” by Wizards RPG Team (Wizards of the Coast)

2. “One Nation” by Ben Carson (Penguin/Sentinel)

3. “America” by Dinesh D’Souza (Regnery)

4. “The Way Forward” by Paul Ryan (Hachette/Twelve)

5. “The Organized Mind” by Daniel J Levitin (Dutton)

6. “In the Kingdom of Ice” by Hampton Sides (Doubleday)

7. “Dungeons & Dragons: Hoard of the Dragon Queen” by Wizards RPG Team (Wizards of the Coast)

8. “Everything I Need to Know I Learned From a Little Golden Book” by Diane Muldrow (Golden Books)

9. “Hard Choices” by Hillary Rodham Clinton (Simon & Schuster)

10. “Excellent Sheep” by William Deresiewicz (Free Press)

11. “The First Family Detail” by Ronald Kessler (Crown)

12. “Blood Feud: The Clintons vs. The Obamas” by Edward Klein (Regnery)

13. “Grain Brain” by David Perlmutter (Little, Brown)

14. “Instinct” by T.D. Jakes (Hachette/FaithWords)

15. “My Drunk Kitchen” by Hannah Hart (Dey Street)

MASS MARKET PAPERBACKS

1. “Sycamore Row” by John Grisham (Dell)

2. “W Is for Wasted” by Sue Grafton (Berkley)

3. “King and Maxwell” by David Baldacci (Grand Central Publishing)

4. “12th of Never” by Patterson/Paetro (Vision)

5. “Deserves to Die” by Lisa Jackson (Kensington/Zebra)

6. “Rose Harbor in Bloom” by Debbie Macomber (Ballantine)

7. “Concealed in Death” by J.D. Robb (Berkley)

8. “Ready for Romance” by Debbie Macomber (Harlequin)

9. “Something New” by Nora Roberts (Silhouette)

10. “Deadline” by Sandra Brown (Vision)

11. “Beautiful Day” by Elin Hilderbrand (Little, Brown)

12. “How the Scoundrel Seduces” by Sabrina Jeffries (Pocket Books)

13. “Dark Wolf” by Christine Feehan (Jove)

14. “Inferno” by Dan Brown (Anchor)

15. “Takedown Twenty” by Janet Evanovich (Bantam)

TRADE PAPERBACKS

1. “Unbroken” by Laura Hillenbrand (Random House)

2. “Gone Girl” by Gillian Flynn (Broadway Books)

3. “Sycamore Row” by John Grisham (Dell)

4. “The Boys in the Boat” by Daniel James Brown (Penguin)

5. “Heaven Is for Real (movie tie-in)” by Todd Burpo (Thomas Nelson)

6. “The Best Yes” by Lysa TerKeurst (Thomas Nelson)

7. “The All-Girl Filling Station’s Last Reunion” by Fannie Flagg (Random House)

8. “Swan Point” by Sherryl Woods (Mira)

9. “10-Day Green Smoothie cleanse” by JJ Smith (Atria)

10. “How to Read Literature Like a Professor” by Thomas C. Foster (Harper Perennial)

11. “We Are Water” by Wally Lamb (Harper Perennial)

12. “The Valley of Amazement” by Amy Tan (Ecco)

13. “Sweet” by Food Network Magazine Eds (Clarkson Potter)

14. “Private L.A.” by James Patterson and Mark Sullivan (Grand Central Publishing

15. “The Ocean at the End of the Lane” by Neil Gaiman (Morrow)

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press.

——

WALL STREET JOURNAL-BEST SELLERS

The Associated Press

Week Ended August 23

FICTION

1. “Four: A Divergent Collection” by Veronica Roth (Katherine Tegen Books)

2. “Percy Jackson’s Greek Gods” by Rick Riordan (Disney Press)

3. “Mean Steak” by Sandra Brown (Grand Central)

4. “Insurgent” by Veronica Roth (Katherine Tegen Books)

5. “Allegiant” by Veronica Roth (Katherine Tegen Books)

6. “Wonder” by R.J. Palacio (Alfred A. Knopf Books for Young Readers)

7. “Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage” by Haruki Murakami (Knopf)

8. “Emperor Pickletine Rides the Bus” by Tom Angleberger (Amulet)

9. “Frozen” by Victoria Saxon (Random House Disney)

10. “Love Letters” by Debbie Macomber (Ballantine)

NONFICTION

1. “Player’s Handbook: A Core Rule” by Wizards RPG Team (Wizards of the Coast)

2. “Minecraft: Redstone Handbook” by Scholastic (Scholastic)

3. “Minecraft: Essential Handbook” by Scholastic (Scholastic)

4. “Strengths Finder 2.0” by Tom Rath (Gallup Press)

5. “One Nation: What We Can All Do” by Ben Carson (Sentinel)

6. “Jesus Calling: Enjoying Peace in His Presence” by Sarah Young (Thomas Nelson)

7. “America: Imagine a World Without Her” by Dinesh D’Souza (Regenry Publishing)

8. “Minecraft: Combat Handbook” by Scholastic (Scholastic)

9. “The Way Forward” by Paul Ryan (Twelve)

10. “The Organized Mind” by Daniel J. Levitin (Dutton Books)

FICTION E-BOOKS

1. “If I Stay” by Gayle Forman (Penguin)

2. “Big Little Lies” by Liane Moriarty (Penguin)

3. “Outlander” by Diana Gabaldon (Random House)

4. “Upside Down” by Fern Michaels (Kensington Publishing)

5. “Where She Went” by Gayle Forman (Penguin)

6. “The Giver” by Lois Lowry (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt)

7. “Mean Streak” by Sandra Brown (Grand Central)

8. “Not a Drill” by Lee Child (Random House)

9. “The Fault in Our Stars” by John Green (Penguin)

10. “The Goldfinch” by Donna Tartt (Little, Brown)

NONFICTION E-BOOKS

1. “The Boys in the Boat” by Daniel James Brown (Viking Press)

2. “The Path Between the Seas” by David McCullough (Simon & Schuster)

3. “Unbroken: A World War II Story” by Laura Hillenbrand (Random House)

4. “The Power of No” by James Altucher (Hay House)

5. “Cocuonut Oil for Beginners” by Rockridge Press (Rockridge Press)

6. “How to Disappear” by Frank M. Ahearn (Rowman & Littlefield)

7. “Tips For Using Your Slow Cooker” by Phyliss Pellman Good (Good Books)

8. “The Freemasons” by Jasper Ridley (Arcade)

9. “Mindfulness Made Simple” by Calistoga Press (Callisto Media)

10. “In the Kingdom of Ice” by Hampton Sides (Knopf Doubleday)

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press.

——

USA TODAY BEST-SELLERS

The Associated Press

Week Ended August 23

FICTION

1. “Four: A Divergent Collection” by Veronica Roth (Katherine Tegen Books)

2. “Percy Jackson’s Greek Gods” by Rick Riordan (Disney Press)

3. “Mean Steak” by Sandra Brown (Grand Central)

4. “Insurgent” by Veronica Roth (Katherine Tegen Books)

5. “Allegiant” by Veronica Roth (Katherine Tegen Books)

6. “Wonder” by R.J. Palacio (Alfred A. Knopf Books for Young Readers)

7. “Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage” by Haruki Murakami (Knopf)

8. “Emperor Pickletine Rides the Bus” by Tom Angleberger (Amulet)

9. “Frozen” by Victoria Saxon (Random House Disney)

10. “Love Letters” by Debbie Macomber (Ballantine)

NONFICTION

1. “Player’s Handbook: A Core Rule” by Wizards RPG Team (Wizards of the Coast)

2. “Minecraft: Redstone Handbook” by Scholastic (Scholastic)

3. “Minecraft: Essential Handbook” by Scholastic (Scholastic)

4. “Strengths Finder 2.0” by Tom Rath (Gallup Press)

5. “One Nation: What We Can All Do” by Ben Carson (Sentinel)

6. “Jesus Calling: Enjoying Peace in His Presence” by Sarah Young (Thomas Nelson)

7. “America: Imagine a World Without Her” by Dinesh D’Souza (Regenry Publishing)

8. “Minecraft: Combat Handbook” by Scholastic (Scholastic)

9. “The Way Forward” by Paul Ryan (Twelve)

10. “The Organized Mind” by Daniel J. Levitin (Dutton Books)

FICTION E-BOOKS

1. “If I Stay” by Gayle Forman (Penguin)

2. “Big Little Lies” by Liane Moriarty (Penguin)

3. “Outlander” by Diana Gabaldon (Random House)

4. “Upside Down” by Fern Michaels (Kensington Publishing)

5. “Where She Went” by Gayle Forman (Penguin)

6. “The Giver” by Lois Lowry (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt)

7. “Mean Streak” by Sandra Brown (Grand Central)

8. “Not a Drill” by Lee Child (Random House)

9. “The Fault in Our Stars” by John Green (Penguin)

10. “The Goldfinch” by Donna Tartt (Little, Brown)

NONFICTION E-BOOKS

1. “The Boys in the Boat” by Daniel James Brown (Viking Press)

2. “The Path Between the Seas” by David McCullough (Simon & Schuster)

3. “Unbroken: A World War II Story” by Laura Hillenbrand (Random House)

4. “The Power of No” by James Altucher (Hay House)

5. “Coconut Oil for Beginners” by Rockridge Press (Rockridge Press)

6. “How to Disappear” by Frank M. Ahearn (Rowman & Littlefield)

7. “Tips For Using Your Slow Cooker” by Phyliss Pellman Good (Good Books)

8. “The Freemasons” by Jasper Ridley (Arcade)

9. “Mindfulness Made Simple” by Calistoga Press (Callisto Media)

10. “In the Kingdom of Ice” by Hampton Sides (Knopf Doubleday)

For the extended, interactive and searchable version of this list, visit http://books.usatoday.com/list/index

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press.

 ———

Springsteen picture book out in November

NEW YORK (AP) — The Boss is getting into the picture book business.

“Outlaw Pete,” which is based on a ballad from Bruce Springsteen’s “Working on a Dream” album, will be published by Simon & Schuster on Nov. 4. The publisher said Thursday that the book will feature Springsteen’s lyrics and illustrations by Frank Caruso. Springsteen’s song was inspired by the children’s book “Brave Cowboy Bill,” which came out in 1950. Springsteen has said that his mother used to tell him bedtime stories about Cowboy Bill.

Another rock ‘n’ roll superstar, Keith Richards, has a picture book out this fall. “Gus & Me,” scheduled for release Sept. 9, is a tribute to Richards’ grandfather, musician Gus Dupree.

———

Jamaica Kincaid wins American Book Award

NEW YORK (AP) — Author Jamaica Kincaid and film critic Armond White are among the winners of the 35th annual American Book Awards, which celebrate multiculturalism and free expression.

The Before Columbus Foundation announced Tuesday that Kincaid was cited for the novel “See Now Then.” White received an “Anti-Censorship Award” because of his being “unfairly removed” from the New York Film Critics Circle. In January, he was expelled after allegedly heckling “12 Years a Slave” director Steve McQueen at the group’s annual awards banquet. White, known for his contrarian views, has called the allegations a “barrage of lies.”

Other winners include Andrew Bacevich’s nonfiction “Breach of Trust” and Alex Espinoza’s novel “The Five Acts of Diego Leon.” The awards will be presented Oct. 26 in San Francisco.

The Before Columbus Foundation is a nonprofit founded by author-playwright Ishmael Reed.

———

Publisher acquires Robin Williams biography

NEW YORK (AP) — A New York Times cultural reporter who has written extensively about Robin Williams is working on a book about the late actor-comedian.

Henry Holt and Co. announced Tuesday it had acquired a planned biography by the Times’ Dave Itzkoff. The book is currently untitled. No publication date has been set.

Williams was the manic superstar of the sitcom “Mork and Mindy” and later won an Oscar for his work in “Good Will Hunting.” He committed suicide at age 63. His body was found in his Northern California home on Aug. 11.

Itzkoff’s “Mad as Hell: The Making of Network and the Fateful Vision of the Angriest Man in Movies” was published this year.

———

Robert Hass wins $100,000 poetry prize

NEW YORK (AP) — Robert Hass, a Pulitzer Prize winner and former U.S. poet laureate, has received a $100,000 lifetime achievement award.

The Academy of American Poets announced Tuesday that Hass had been given the Wallace Stevens award for “outstanding and proven mastery.” The 73-year-old Hass is known for such collections as “Time and Materials” and “The Apple Trees at Olema.” Previous winners of the Stevens award include John Ashbery and Adrienne Rich.

Also Tuesday, the academy awarded a $25,000 fellowship to Tracy K. Smith, who in 2012 won the Pulitzer Prize for “Life On Mars.”

The academy is a nonprofit organization founded in 1934.

———

This week’s McClatchy-Tribune book reviews:

 

“Yeah! Yeah! Yeah! The Story of Pop Music From Bill Haley to Beyonce” by Bob Stanley (Norton, $29.95)

The title suggests the folly of the endeavor: “Yeah! Yeah! Yeah! The Story of Pop Music From Bill Haley to Beyonce.” Really? The whole story? Yeah, that’s what Bob Stanley is going for here. Doo-wop, the Beatles, folk rock, Philadelphia soul, punk and post-punk, Prince and Madonna, grunge, hip-hop, Britpop and so many points in between. All woven together in a semilinear narrative.

You can laugh if you want. Then you can try putting it down. Opinionated, digressive, quick to play favorites — Stanley, a music journalist who also plays keyboards for the English indie dance band Saint Etienne, loves pop music the way a dog loves its master.

Stanley doesn’t cut a lot of corners; at 556 pages plus bibliography and index, “Yeah! Yeah! Yeah!” could be mistaken for a speaker cabinet. If he’s more insightful on acid house than he is on hip-hop (which he’s actually pretty strong on), he can be forgiven. The book’s pleasures lie in its eccentricities, its wit and its ability to make connections across decades and subgenres. This is, in fact, a narrative, or a rather a series of tributaries, in which the Brill Building succumbs to the Beatles, the sound systems of Jamaica sprout the roots of hip-hop, and Joy Division, rest in peace, becomes New Order.

“Yeah! Yeah! Yeah!” is by its very nature incomplete, its ambition impossible to meet. Where’s Nine Inch Nails? Where’s Jay-Z or Nas? To which I hear myself say, shut up and enjoy. Quixotic and kaleidoscopic,Yeah! Yeah! Yeah! serves up erudite irreverence on every page.

—Chris Vognar, Dallas Morning News

———

“Your Face in Mine: A Novel” by Jess Row; Riverhead Hardcover (384 pages, $27.95)

Jess Row’s provocative new novel arrives at a time when the talk we once heard about a post-racial America has sputtered (Google “Ferguson, Missouri” if you’re unsure why). Race is the impossible subject, the incendiary issue that conquers and divides. And yet in his first novel Row drives into this inflammatory subject head-on with thought-provoking bravado and the sort of guts that make you fall in love with the versatility and power of fiction all over again.

“Your Face in Mine” opens with an audacious idea that verges on science fiction. Kelly Thorndike, a Baltimore native back in his hometown after a tragedy, runs into a man on the street whom he can’t quite place. The man, who is black, greets him. “Kelly,” he says. “It’s Martin.”

Martin Lipkin was a high school friend. White like Kelly, but not anymore. He’s the recipient of voluntary racial-reassignment surgery.

But of course, willingly, eagerly changing your race — and hoping to monetize the process internationally by publicizing your deeply personal act — is not only a big thing; it’s the biggest thing, a potent cultural hand grenade.

What happens to the world when altering our race becomes possible? Martin compares it to gender surgery, calling himself a modern-day Christine Jorgensen. But as Kelly delves deeper into Martin’s past, a troubling secret agenda emerges.

Row fumbles a bit when Kelly finally unburdens himself of his own secret, which eventually turns out to be relevant to the story but is maybe less necessary than the author imagines. But the depiction of cultural dissonance is incisive.

The givens, though, are shifting. As one of Martin’s colleagues tells Kelly: “The future of whiteness is colors.” She may be right. Either way, as we head toward a multihued future, Row has provided us with stimulating fuel for the ride.

—Connie Ogle, Miami Herald

———

“We Are Not Ourselves: A Novel” by Matthew Thomas; Simon & Schuster (640 pages, $28)

Matthew Thomas’ first novel, “We Are Not Ourselves,” is an epic of small events. By that I don’t mean its story is insignificant but quotidian: the particular struggles of the day-to-day. A family saga, spanning three generations, the book is centered around Eileen Tumulty, a daughter of the Irish working-class in Queens, N.Y. Eileen’s existence is summed up in the first two syllables of that last name — tumult — or more accurately, in the drive to push past her limitations, which have been imposed in many ways by time and place.

Grace is hard to come by, at least for Eileen. Her husband, Edmund Leary, is a research scientist who turns down promotions to continue teaching at a community college. Their son Connell, named for the author of “Mrs. Bridge,” remains curiously recalcitrant, socially awkward and increasingly distanced the older he becomes.

Thomas, who grew up in Queens, clearly understands his territory; at times, “We Are Not Ourselves” reads like a family history in its evocation of New York’s outer boroughs and second-tier suburbia of the 1980s, with their mix of immigrants and culture clash. He is unafraid to portray this in all its complexity, most acutely when it comes to Eileen, who recoils at the changing face of her community.

What we’re seeing is a complex character, with competing agendas and motivations, some at levels she can’t access. This becomes increasingly pronounced after Ed starts acting strangely and is diagnosed with Alzheimer’s. His decline occupies the final two-thirds of the novel, as Eileen and Connell struggle for containment, adrift in a new house in Westchester, as alone as they have ever been.

“We Are Not Ourselves” is a solid first novel, unsentimental, multilayered, evocative of a lost world. At the same time, there is too much that ties up too neatly.

—David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times

———

“I Can See in the Dark” by Karin Fossum; Houghton Mifflin Harcourt (256 pages, $25)

Over the years, I’ve read lots of Scandinavian crime fiction, but nothing from Norwegian novelist Karin Fossum. In retrospect, that was a huge oversight.

This is a taut, well-paced book written totally from the point of view of a sociopath named Riktor. From the opening pages, his observations reveal his distorted worldview.

He works in a nursing home where he inflicts hidden cruelties on helpless residents. The title of the book comes from his claim that, indeed, he can see in the dark. Readers quickly learn, though, that reality and Riktor’s view of reality often differ.

For most of the book, Riktor wrestles with irony. He’s accused of doing something he didn’t do, all the while knowing there are crimes he did commit that he hasn’t been accused of — yet.

Page after page, layer after layer, Riktor reveals his madness and his growing separation from others and society in general.

“The pious will also perish, and we’ll get no reward in heaven,” he narrates mid-book. “So what was the point of exerting ourselves?”

Considering he had just committed a terrible crime, it’s chilling to see Riktor consider himself on the side of piety. The last line of the novel is especially chilling, considering Norway’s tendency toward lenient criminal penalties. But it’s perfect in the context of the character.

—Gary Jacobson, Dallas Morning News

———

“Haunted” by Randy Wayne White; Putnam (356 pages, $26.95)

Randy Wayne White has built a legacy exploring Florida’s history and ecology. But an evocative look at Florida and its often ignored role in the Civil War can’t make up for a lack of action in “Haunted,” his third novel about Hannah Smith, a Gulf Coast fishing guide and private detective.

“Haunted” is more like a visit with an old friend who’s having a really unusual adventure — and working on an entry into ancestry.com — than the action White has brought to his previous two Hannah novels and which is standard in his 22 novels about Marion “Doc” Ford, a marine biologist who doubles as a government agent.

Hannah is hired by Palm Beach socialite Bunny Tupplemeyer to investigate supernatural events supposedly happening in an abandoned historical house near the Caloosahatchee River between Arcadia and Labelle. Bunny and the other investors planned to build condos on the land, but now she just wants out of the deal. If the roles that the house and land had during the Civil War were never mentioned during the deal, Bunny will be able to prove that the seller broke the disclosure law to get out of the investment. The land is close to Hannah’s heart as two of her distant relatives may have fought there during the Civil War. For clues to the house’s past, Hannah reads her great-great uncle’s Civil War journal, which gives her a chilling and accurate account of often forgotten battles that happened in Florida.

Hannah, so well sculpted in the series’ previous two novels, seems at sea here, as directionless as the plot.

Still, “Haunted” shows that White is a skilled tour guide for a visceral visit to Florida.

—Oline H. Cogdill, Sun Sentinel

© 2014, McClatchy-Tribune

Distributed by MCT Information Services

_____

The Romance Reader: ‘Heroes Are My Weakness’

By Lezlie Patterson | McClatchy News Service (MCT) 

“Heroes Are My Weakness” by Susan Elizabeth Phillips; William Morrow (368 pages, $26.99)

 

It’s getting more and more difficult to find adjectives that adequately describe how fabulous Susan Elizabeth Phillips’ books are.

No one writes humor romance better than the author who has brought readers stories with a bunny who has a speaking part, a woman who met her future husband while dressed as a beaver, a town with more lunatics than Hooterville and now, a woman whose puppets often have conversations in her head.

Phillips’ books offer a quirky humor, often stemming from a determined heroine. In “Heroes Are My Weakness,” Annie is a lovable, admirable, quirky and funny heroine who matches wits with the brooding Theo.

Living in a mansion by the rocky cliffs of a Maine island, Theo is a modern-day version of a gothic hero. Phillips knack for creating outlandish yet explainable scenes once again is evident when Annie and Theo see each other for the first time in many years.

Annie and Theo were step-siblings one summer, during their parents’ very brief marriage. It was the best of times; it was the worst of times. It was the negative that lingered more with Annie, so she wasn’t happy when she realized Theo was in town.

The setting on Peregrine Island is perfect for this modern-day gothic romance. Theo is using his family home to write his second novel, and Annie is using the nearby cottage she inherited from her mother to get her life back together.

Annie can’t reconcile the man she gets to know with the teenager who terrorized her with psychotic behavior many years earlier. She’s drawn to him, even as she remembers him trying to kill her back when.

The great thing about a Phillips book is that you know it’s not going to be depressing, it’s going to end well and you’re going to have a blast reading it.

HOW IT STACKS UP

Overall rating: 5 of 5. Romance doesn’t get any more fun — or any better — than this. Phillips’ trademark quirkiness will keep you delighted, intrigued, entertained and smiling. The only thing depressing about a Phillips’ book is when it ends.

Hunk appeal: 10. Theo is a perfect match for Annie. His reluctance to get emotionally involved in the relationship is the only thing that keeps the plus away. But in fairness, that’s also is what makes the relationship between him and Annie so much fun to read about.

Steamy scene grade: XXXX. So much fun.

Happily ever after: Awesome, with Phillips’ quirkiness and satisfying touch. And there is a super fun epilogue as a bonus.

ALSO THIS WEEK

“From Maverick to Daddy” by Teresa Southwick (2014 paperback), 3 of 5 hearts. Here is another Montana Maverick story from Rust Creek Falls. Caleb Dalton is a love-them-and-leave-them sort of dude, with a knack for staying friends with the women after he dumps them. He’s not interested in marriage and family. Unlike most of the women who move to Rust Creek Falls, Mallory didn’t do so to find a husband — she was looking for a good community to raise the niece she became guardian to. Both think they shouldn’t get involved, but they just can’t help it. And eventually, Caleb realizes that the idea of marriage and family isn’t so bad after all.

Lezlie Patterson is a former columnist for The State newspaper in Columbia, S.C. Readers may send her email at lezlie.patterson@gmail.com. To read more of her romance reviews go to http://lezlie-romance.blogspot.com.

Distributed by MCT Information Services

———

 

Want to leave your comments?

Sign in or Register to comment.