Engineering continues to be a booming career field

By Rob Todor | Alliance Review Published:

Ask people about the image of an engineer and you may get all kinds of descriptions. There's the nerdy guy with thick glasses, mini engines and desks covered in blue prints.

Or there's the scientist in rumpled clothes, poring over a new-fangled, space-age machine that's years away from actual use.

In reality, engineers are a part of our everyday life and have a far greater impact than we could ever imagine.

Engineers held 1.6 million jobs in 2008. The highest number of these jobs were in civil engineering, mechanical engineering, industrial engineering, electrical engineering and electronic engineering.

Generally speaking, engineering employment is expected to continue to grow.

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts that biomedical, environmental and civil engineering will experience much faster than average growth.

"Job prospects for engineers are really good, especially for young ones," Lawrence Jacobson, executive director of the National Society of Professional Engineers in Alexandria, Va., tells usnews.com.

He and other industry watchers see demand across the board, especially in electrical, biomedical, aerospace, computer, automotive, environmental, mechanical, and petroleum engineering.

The website money.cnn.com lists Biomedical engineer as one of the top 10 booming jobs in the United States, projecting a 10-year growth of positions to fill by 72 percent.

Another engineering specialty that is sure to grow in Northeast and Eastern Ohio is petroleum engineering.

The Utica Shale project has just started in Carroll and Columbiana counties, and is projected to cover much of northern Ohio in the next decade.

The need for field engineers is growing. A field engineer will conduct quality control testing on rig sites and supervise operations.

A drilling engineer must be experienced and understand concepts such as casing design, hydraulics, and other basic work associated with on-site drilling techniques.

Of course, engineering opportunities are not limited to the gas and oil industry.

There are many companies in the Stark County area, such as Alliance Castings, Goodyear, Lockheed Martin and Babcock & Wilcox, which have needs for engineers in all areas of production, design, development and applications.

Engineers should enjoy mathematics and science, be very detail-oriented and analytical, have good communication skills and enjoy working in teams.

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