Scathing Cleveland LinkedIn messages, dumping sediment in Lake Erie and an Aurora tree canopy obstacle course: News Around Your Area

Rebecca Reis | Web Editor Published:

Here are some of today's top headlines from around the area, including the scathing Cleveland LinkedIn message heard around the world, a battle over dumping Cuyahoga River sediment into Lake Erie and a chance to "go ape" in the trees of Aurora.

GO APE IN AURORA: A high ropes challenge course — where people can safely adventure through the trees 30-feet above the ground — is likely coming to Aurora this year, according to the Aurora Advocate. The Aurora Parks and Recreation Department is awaiting a contract from Go Ape, which has six other locations, and approval from Aurora City Council to go through with the plan. The Go Ape company builds an obstacle course through the trees made of rope bridges, zip lines and "tartan swings." The city will benefit from a percentage of the price of admission. Click here to read more at auroraadvocate.com.

AIR MARSHALS: The Cleveland Federal Air Marshal Service field office is one of six that will be closed by June 2016, according to the Northeast Ohio Media Group. The Transportation Security Administration says no positions will be eliminated and none of the closings will impact air safety. Federal air marshals travel undercover on U.S. flights to prevent terrorist attacks. Of the other five that will close, San Diego and Tampa will close by the end of 2014, Pittsburgh and Phoenix will close in June 2015 and the Cincinnati office will close along with Cleveland's in June 2016. Click here to read more at cleveland.com.

LAKE ERIE: The Ohio Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers are contending over a plan to dump sediment dredged from the Cuyahoga River and Cleveland Harbor into Lake Erie for the first time in 40 years, according to the Akron Beacon Journal. The Corps wants to dredge 475,000 cubic yards of sediments starting in May and dump up to 180,000 cupid yards into Lake Erie between Cleveland and Rocky River, dumping the remaining sediment in disposal facilities on land along the shoreline. The EPA says it is worried the sediment will increase toxicity in fish like walleye and perch, but the Corps said the dump will not have any significant impact. Click here to read more at ohio.com.

SEWER DISTRICT: The Ohio Supreme Court has agreed to hear the Northeast Ohio Regional Sewer District's appeal of a a September 2013 Eighth District Court of Appeals ruling that the Sewer District did not have the authority to manage stormwater or impose a stormwater fee, according to the Nordonia Hills News-Leader. NEORSD created the Regional Stormwater Management Program to address flooding, stream bank erosion and water quality issues in much of Northeast Ohio. Several areas, including Macedonia, Hudson, Northfield Village, Richfield Village and Sagamore HIlls Township settled in 2012 and agreed to pay the fee as long as a portion of that money is used for community projects, although 11 Cuyahoga County communities filed appeals for a trial court ruling in 2012 that allowed the fee. If the Ohio Supreme Court rules that NEORSD is not authorized to manage stormwater and impose a fee, that settlement would be void. Click here to read more at the-news-leader.com.

LINKEDIN: Kelly Blazek, the head of a popular Cleveland marketing communications job bank listserv, felt the blast of online rage Tuesday after one of her scathing replies to someone who tried to connect with her on LinkedIn went viral, according to the Plain Dealer. Diana Mekota, a John Carroll University graduate moving back to the Cleveland area, requested to connect with Blazek on LinkedIn and also requested to receive her listserv updates, despite not knowing Blazek personally. "Your invite to connect is inappropriate, beneficial only to you, and tacky. Wow, I cannot wait to let every 25-year-old jobseeker mine my top-tier marketing connections to help them land a job. Love the sense of entitlement in your generation," part of the reply from Blazek read. Mekota shared the replies on social media sites and the story went viral, earning many negative responses from Cleveland-area professionals. Blazek sent an apology to Mekota and to the Plain Dealer, deleted much of her online presence and but restarted her @NEOHCommJobs Twitter account Wednesday. Click here to read more at cleveland.com.

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