NFL Playoff Roundup: Colts, Saints win in thrilling fashion in Wild Card action

Associated Press Published:

Associated Press

INDIANAPOLIS -- Andrew Luck threw three touchdown passes after halftime, including a 64-yarder to a wide-open T.Y. Hilton for the go-ahead score with 4:22 left, leading the Indianapolis Colts from a four-TD deficit to an improbable 45-44 comeback victory over the Kansas City Chiefs in an AFC Wild Card game Saturday.

Indianapolis (12-5) became the second team in playoff history to win after trailing by 28 or more points, according to STATS. The other: Buffalo over Houston 41-38 in overtime in January 1993. The Colts will travel to either Denver or New England next weekend for the divisional round with four straight wins.

Luck was 29-of-45 for 443 yards, the second-highest total in franchise history for a playoff game, with four TDs and three interceptions. He also picked up a fumble and ran it in for a 5-yard score. Hilton broke a franchise playoff record with 13 catches and 224 yards, finishing with two TDs -- including the winner.

Kansas City (11-6) finished its turnaround season with three straight losses, two to the Colts and an eighth straight postseason defeat -- none more stunning than this one. The eight straight losses broke a tie with the Detroit Lions for the longest playoff skid.

Alex Smith was 30 of 46 for 378 yards with four TDs and no interceptions on a day he lost his top two running backs, Jamaal Charles and Knile Davis, and starting receiver Donnie Avery to injuries.

Saints 26, Eagles 24

PHILADELPHIA -- Shayne Graham, signed by the Saints just over two weeks ago, kicked a 32-yard field goal on the final play Saturday night to give New Orleans its first road playoff victory, 26-24 over the Philadelphia Eagles.

Graham's third field goal sent the Saints (12-5) to Seattle for next Saturday's divisional playoff game against the NFC's top seed. The Seahawks routed the Saints 34-7 during the season.

Drew Brees threw for a touchdown, Mark Ingram rushed for 97 yards and another score, and the Saints' defense slowed Chip Kelly's uptempo offense just enough. New Orleans had been 0-5 in postseason games outside of the Big Easy since entering the league in 1967.

Philadelphia wound up 10-7 in Kelly's first year as coach. He guided them from worst to first in the NFC East, but they were only 4-5 at home.

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