Loss to Canada in gold-medal game leaves U.S. women's team heartbroken

By Greg Beacham | Associated Press Published:

By Greg Beacham | Associated Press

SOCHI, Russia -- A two-goal lead blown in the final four minutes. A long shot that clanged off the post of an empty net. Two perplexing penalties in overtime, setting up a golden goal for Canada.

The U.S. women's hockey team has lost late in the last four Olympics, but never in such preposterously heartbreaking fashion as this 3-2 defeat on Thursday night.

While the Canadians received their fourth straight gold medals, the Americans were left blank-faced or crying at Bolshoy Ice Dome. Sixteen years after the first generation of U.S. players won the inaugural Olympic tournament, these Americans thought Canada's Olympic mastery over them had finally waned.

Instead, they've got four more years to think about how the Canadians manage to seize their sport's biggest moment while the U.S. gets left holding silver.

"To let them come back in the gold-medal game at the Olympics is the worst feeling in the world," said Kelli Stack, who nearly became an improbable hero with a long clearing attempt that hit the right post of an empty net late in regulation.

Stack actually knew she hadn't scored when she flipped the puck down the ice in the waning seconds. From her vantage point, she could tell it was going to hit the post even before that clunk of rubber against metal.

"If it would have been an inch to the right, it would have went in, and we would have won the gold medal," said Stack, shaking her head. "When pucks don't bounce your way, you've just got to know that it wasn't meant to be."

Everything seemed dramatically different in the first 56 minutes. With a 2-0 lead, U.S. goalie Jessie Vetter appeared to be eminently capable of shutting out Canada for the first time in Olympic history, and the small contingent of U.S. fans was bouncing in its seats.

"I just kept thinking 'We're going to win,'" U.S. captain Meghan Duggan said. "I looked over at one of our goaltenders, I said, 'There's no way they're going to score two goals on Vetts. She's hot right now.'"

The pain was palpable on the faces of the Americans, Canada's only rival in this young sport. The U.S. women really had seemed destined to triumph in Sochi, repeatedly playing better than the Canadians in exhibitions and tournaments. What's more, Canada coach Dan Church abruptly quit in mid-December.

"You can't take the sting away," coach Katey Stone said. "You just have to tell them how proud you are of them and how much they mean to you and what a tremendous privilege and honor it was to be a part of it."

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